Best Metabolic Workout Plan

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Articles, Fitness | Posted on 23-11-2012-05-2008

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By Craig Ballantyne

The latest Men’s Health magazine contained a shocking research study stat.

According to the article, you can boost your sleeping metabolic rate by 8 percent more than normal IF you workout with heavier weights.

That adds up to over 5 pounds per year…and it’s why I’m a big fan of creating intense Turbulence Training workouts for BOTH men and women for rapid fat loss.

If you don’t challenge yourself with exercises in the 6-8 rep range then you’re leaving your metabolic burn boost benefit on the table.

Don’t make that mistake.

To get maximum results, you need to use a fat loss workout system like this:

Step #1 – Bodyweight Warm-up

Step #2 – Metabolic Resistance Training (sets of 8 reps)

Step #3 – Metabolic Conditioning Training (higher reps) or Intervals

Let’s say you only had 20 minutes to workout.

You could do this 20-minute metabolic boosting TT workout:

MRT: Metabolic Resistance Training
– 8 reps per exercise (per side, if applicable)
– No rest between exercises
– 60 second rest at the end of the circuit
– Repeat for 3 rounds

1A) Goblet Squat or Narrow-Stance Barbell Squat
1B) DB Row or TRX Rows
1C) DB Incline Press or Decline Spiderman Pushups (try with TRX)
1D) Goblet Bulgarian Split Squat

Take a 2 minute break and then move on to MCT.

MCT: Metabolic Conditioning Training
– 40 seconds per exercise (per side, if applicable)
– Rest 20 seconds between exercises
– Repeat for 6 minutes straight

2A) Kettlebell Swings
2B) DB Lunge or Prisoner Lunge
2C) Elevated Pushups (switch sides after 20 seconds) or TRX Rows

That’s it, short and metabolically-boosting-calorie-burning sweet.

If you liked that, you’ll love the complete Metabolic Workouts package and bodyweight Bonuses that you’ll get in the Turbulence Training Black Friday Sale.

This is the best Black Friday sale that you’re going to get anywhere at anytime, and you don’t have to camp out all night at Wal-Mart to do so.

Grab all 13 classic TT Workouts for 93% off the regular price.

There’s never been a deal like this before, AND you get access to all the TT Metabolic Resistance Training fat burning workouts.

The complete package includes:

1) The Bodyweight Cardio Pack
2) TT MRT 1.0 and TT MRT 2.0 (2 of the most popular TT workouts)
3) TT for Beginners and Total Torso Training
4) TT Thermogenic-30 (The 2012 Workout of the Year)

http://tinyurl.com/cy5pxqo

2 Workouts that Saved Guru Personal Trainer from Embarrassment

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Articles, Fitness | Posted on 19-11-2012-05-2008

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By Craig Ballantyne, CTT
Creator, Turbulence Training

In 1996 I was embarrassingly skinny. I remember sitting with my friends and being ashamed of my formerly athletic body.

And all of this happened for an embarrassing reason.

You see, in 1994 I was a 180 pound 19 year old kid heading off to my first year of college to study exercise science.

My bench press was 225 pounds. I was in my prime.

But then I made a huge mistake.

I listened to my Exercise Physiology professor talk about long slow cardio workouts, and I made the mistake of switching my lifting for cardio.

Two years later, at my most pathetic strength and physique levels, I was 142 pounds. YIKES.

People thought there was something wrong with me.

Fortunately, I got my head switched on right, thanks to a more advanced Exercise Physiology class in my final year of my Undergraduate program.

And then in the summer before starting my Master’s Degree, everything finally clicked.

I started using the Turbulence Training style workouts that would come to dominate my life.

It was a combination of non-competing supersets, intense training, basic-but-brilliant exercises, intervals instead of cardio, and fewer, shorter workouts than ever before that…

FINALLY gave me the fitness cover model body that you’ve seen in my pictures on the net, the Toronto Star, and in GQ magazine.

Now to be honest, I’ve never written about this before because I always felt it was too embarrassing to share with you.

But lately on the Turbulence Training Facebook page so many readers have been asking, “What workouts did you use to get your body?” that I realized I needed to tell YOU the full story.

The exact workout style that I used to get ripped abs, chisel my chest, and build my biceps are found in the main Turbulence Training manual and are called:

TT 2K3 and TT 2K4

Each workout lasts 4 weeks, and I guarantee that if you use these programs – just like I did – that you’ll get ripped and build a lean sexy body by the time January rolls around.

Listen, I was once like you and I know what’s it’s like to not get results. But it’s not your fault.

Perhaps you were led down the wrong path by a teacher, a trainer, or more likely, a poorly designed program in a magazine.

It’s time for all that to end.

It’s time for you to build the body you’ve always wanted.

Just like I did, using the same workouts.

And because I know your frustration, you’re receiving a special offer this week.

You’ll get the complete Turbulence Training system I used to build my body – including the legendary TT 2K3 and TT 2K4 workouts – all while saving 50% off the regular price (and getting inside-access to our private member’s area).

Save 50% on Turbulence Training and change your body today
http://tinyurl.com/4yxhrrl

I know what’s it’s like to not get what you want.

But I also know what it’s like to have found the solution.

Get started today and make the same body transformation that I’ve been able to make.

You can do it,

Craig Ballantyne, CTT
Certified Turbulence Trainer

PS – You’ll also get 5 bonus workouts…

…that I’ve created for men AND women over the years to help them get continuous results and an even sexier body.

My gift to you when you start Turbulence Training today.

Get 50% off Turbulence Training and 5 FREE workouts
http://tinyurl.com/4yxhrrl

Plus, you’ll get to ask me all of your training and diet questions on our private TT Forum.

Take This Very Seriously

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Articles, Fitness | Posted on 04-09-2012-05-2008

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By Craig Ballantyne, CTT
Certified Turbulence Trainer

Earlier today I was invited to do another Tough Mudder.

I laughed. I’m done with those.

Listen, they are fun and rewarding, don’t get me wrong.

But I’ve done two and training for them/recovering from them are getting in the way of my REAL goals.

If life is getting in the way of your REAL GOALS, you know how I feel, right?

Time to prioritize.

There are only 4 months left in 2012. About 120 days. Not much time to reach those big goals you set on back on January 1st, 2012.

Fortunately, I have the solution for you.

The 15th Turbulence Training Transformation Contest starts TODAY and ends in December. This is the SPARK you need to change your body and your life.

What do you have left in you for 2012?

What is there still to accomplish?

Think dammit, and take this very, very seriously.

This is your life. And “life is not a dress rehearsal”, as author Rose Tremain once said.

Stop paying lip service to your goals. Stop daydreaming about your dreams.

Start living as if they really mattered. Today. Right NOW.

“We are entering the last few months of 2012. That means if you lose 1-2 lbs on average of fat per week, you could be as much as 32 lbs lighter by Christmas. Now that’s a cool Christmas gift to yourself. Something to think about.” – Mike Whitfield, Certified Turbulence Trainer

We are running out of time in 2012, but…

…on the other hand, ANYONE can commit to 12 weeks of transformation. It’s ONLY 0.3% of your life. And surely you can commit to 0.3% of your life to completely transform your body and your life, right?

When you look at it that way, it’s simple. Fat loss is not easy, but it IS simple when you follow a proven plan.

Join the 15th TT Transformation Contest and you could even win $1000 of my money just for losing your belly fat, getting ripped abs, and sculpting your arms.

=> http://tinyurl.com/9x539gf

Imagine…just 12 weeks from now, you’re leaner, healthier, more energetic, sexier, more confident, and in line for a chance to get $1000 from me. Pretty cool, huh?

That would make for best Christmas ever. Even better than that time you got a BB gun and almost shot someone’s eye out.

So seriously…

Stop paying lip service to your goals. Stop daydreaming about your dreams.

Start living as if they really mattered. Today. Right NOW.

Let’s do this.

Let’s TRANSFORM your body and life. Starting today.

I need you. I need you to be part of my 1 Million Transformation Mission because I’m running out of time on my goals.

We’re in this together.

Let’s go.

“Inaction breeds doubt and fear. Action breeds confidence and courage. If you want to conquer fear, do not sit home and think about it. Go out and get busy.” – Dale Carnegie

=> http://tinyurl.com/9x539gf

Let’s get busy.

Time to change,

Craig Ballantyne, CTT
Certified Turbulence Trainer

PS – More of today’s Kickbutt Mindset Tips…

“The best years of your life are the ones in which you decide your problems are your own. You do not blame them on your mother, the ecology, or the president. You realize that you control your own destiny.” – Albert Ellis

“Let no act be done without a purpose.” – Marcus Aurelius

PPS – Enough is enough…

It’s time to take action.

Join the 15th TT Transformation Contest today

You can make huge changes before the end of 2012.

I believe in you.

=> http://tinyurl.com/9x539gf

Hardcore Workout C

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Abs, Articles, Fitness, Videos | Posted on 20-05-2012-05-2008

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This is TT Hardcore Workout C.

This metabolic resistance circuit that we start with is one of my favorites I’ve ever put together. This will challenge you in so many different ways.

Start with a depth jump. Elevate yourself a little less than a foot or even less than that. If you are not ready for the jump, you can do regular jumps or bodyweight squats. However, if you are only able to do bodyweight squats, you are probably in the wrong workout. It’s very advanced. Make sure you do not preform this on concrete floors.

Step off with one foot and right into a squat and immediately jump straight up and land soft with your hips back to absorb the force of the jump with your muscles. You will do 6 reps.

Move to a deadlift. You will hold for a 2 second pause at the bottom of each repetition. Move the bar right up against your shins, use an overhand grip, press your hips back while arching your lower back. Pull up and slowly lower down for 3 seconds, pausing for 1 count. Reset, arch your back and pull up. Do 8 reps.

Move immediately into pushups. You will be doing 50% of your maximum number (if you can do 60, you will only do 30). Lower down, keeping your abs braced and holding your body in a straight line and drive back up.

Finish with a Turkish get-up with a kettlebell. Lie down, bring the weight up pressing strong. come up and slide your leg up and under while holding your arm up and keeping your shoulder in a strong position the entire time. Move your leg back out and slowly lower down without losing control of your arm and weight. Do all reps on one side and then switch and repeat on the other side.

That concludes our first metabolic circuit of Workout C.

The second metabolic circuit starts with a 1-leg bench squat. Stand on the bench with your hands out in front of you. Step off the bench to the side, while you push your hips back for a 4 second lowering phase. You can touch the floor if you need to, but if you can control it, just stop right before your foot reaches the floor and come back up. Do 10 reps and repeat on the other side.

After that, you will do renegade rows with either flat hex dumbbells or kettlebells. Start with your body in a straight line with your abs braced. Row the weights up and alternate sides (using the same amount of weights on each side).

You will be doing pushups with your hands on the stability ball. These work your triceps a little more. Keep your body in a straight line and lower down. Drive back up. Some people have some wrist problems with that exercise, so you can do a different kind of pushup in place of them. You can do pushups with your feet on the ball or close grip type pushups.

Finish with hanging leg raises. The easiest grip is with the bars that go straight out so your palms face one another. Keep your abs braced and bring your legs up. Keep it controlled on the way down.

If you can’t do those, you can do stability ball rollouts in place of them. Roll out with a stretch on the way out, keeping it controlled and contract your abs on the way up.

And, we have one more superset to go.

First up will be a burpee/chin-up combo. You will start with a burpee, dropping down, add a pushup and come back up with a jump. Then move immediately into a chin-up with an underhand grip. Go right back into a burpee and then a chin-up. This is great for people who can’t do so many chin-ups in a row. You will get that little break with the burpee. You want to do 10 of these, but if you can’t do 10 chinups, just do as many as you can and then finish the rest with just burpees.

For the last exercise, you will do cross body mountain climbers with your feet on the ball. This is a little bit harder than the ones we did earlier. Do 8 reps per side (alternating sides).

Rest and repeat.

Finish up with adrenaline interval training. This time you will do 36 seconds of work with 54 seconds of recovery. This is still the same 2-3 ratio of interval training to rest. It’s a lot easier to do on a machine for interval training.

2 things you can change up, you can do your interval training the day after your workout days. You can change that up so you can do shorter workouts.

http://tinyurl.com/4yxhrrl

Hardcore Workout B

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Abs, Articles, Fitness, Videos | Posted on 19-05-2012-05-2008

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This is Workout B from TT Hardcore 2K10.

You’ll be doing 6 repetitions of 6 exercises in this workout.

Start with a barbell complex, but start with an empty barbell for the first time you go through this. You can even use a broomstick for this. If you are training at home, you can even use dumbbells.

Start with Romanian Dead Lifts. Press your hips back as far as you can, keep a flat back and then drive back up to feel that stretch in your hamstrings.

Next up is a hang clean (6 reps), so you will do a little dip, drive up and catch the bar underneath. You want to get that extension, especially when you have some weight on it.

Move right into front squats. Keep your elbows up, push your hips back as you lower and drive back up for 6 reps.

Next is a military press. You will be limited in this entire complex by the weight you can military press or push press, but I want you to choose a weight you can press overhead 15 times. Press up and with your last one, bring the bar behind your head to move directly into a back squat.

For back squats, press your hips down and back and drive back up.

Finish with a forward lunge. Step forward, lunge and drive up, alternating sides.

You will find that your upper back and legs will be a little fatigued with this complex.

Do these 6 exercises with 6 repetitions for each one, rest and repeat for a total of 3 times through.

After the complex, we’re going to move into a couple of tri-sets. We’ll have a lot of resistance training, but no interval training.

Move right into a 3-exercise circuit starting with either underhanded inverted rows or a chin-up with knee up.

For the chin-up with knee-up, we’re going to combine our lats and biceps with abs. Use an underhand grip, do a chin-up while bringing your knees up and back down nice and slow. Do 2 reps short of failure (if you can do 10 of them, you will only do 8).

If you cannot do the chin-up with knee up, you can do underhanded inverted rows instead. With your palms facing you and your body in a straight line, pull yourself up and slowly lower back down. This is an easier exercise, but if you want to work your upper back a bit more, this will do that.

Next, move into spiderman climb pushups. These are the same as spiderman pushups, except you will touch your foot to the ground. Start in pushup position and bring your knee to your elbow as you lower down. Keep your abs braced. Do 1 repetition short of failure for these. If you can do 10 reps, then only do 9 reps.

Finish this circuit with a 1-leg stability ball leg curls (this is why we did so much hamstring warmup). This is a powerful exercise for your hamstrings. Raise one leg up and bridge your hips. Curl the ball in and back out, contracting your hamstring. Do all reps on one side and repeat on the other side.

Rest 1 minute and repeat this circuit 2 more times.

We’re going to finish this workout with something that is a bit different than usual. We’ll finish with 3 exercises in a circuit, but we’re going to do 5 reps for each.

First up are incline presses. Drive up and in and slowly lower down and out for 3 seconds. With the incline, you will be working the deltoid muscles more.

Move directly into dumbbell split squats. You will probably use lighter weights for these. Start with your lead leg out in front. Your lead leg will be doing all the work, while your rear leg will be used for balance and stretching through your quadricep. Lower and hold for a 1 second pause at the bottom and drive back up through your lead leg (quadricep) and your glute. Do 5 reps on each side.

Next move into a stability ball ab pike. Start with your feet on the ball and keep your body in a straight line. Push your hips straight up pike in and back out. Go as high as you can. You will do 5 reps.

Rest 1 minute and repeat 4 more times (for a total of 5 times total).

At this point, you may be fairly tired out, but you still might be able to press out a decent amount of weight.

No interval training for workout B.

http://tinyurl.com/4yxhrrl

Hardcore Workout A

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Abs, Articles, Fitness, Videos | Posted on 18-05-2012-05-2008

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This is Workout A from the TT Hardcore 2K10 program.

We’re going to start with a metabolic resistance circuit of 4 exercises starting with an explosive power exercise with 3 vertical jumps (each one being it’s own repetition). You can do these with your hands up behind your head. Squat down and drive up and land soft on your feet with your knees bent and your hips back. Use your muscles to absorb the force.

You will next move into dumbbell chest presses. Lie flat on the bench and press up and in, slowly lower down and out for 3 reps.

Next, move into dumbbell reverse lunges (you will probably use lighter weights than you were using for the chest press). Step back with your chest up, using your lead leg to pull you back up while you contract your glute. Do all reps on one side and then switch to the other side.

The next exercise will be a 45 second stability ball plank. Keep your body in a straight line and hold with your abs braced and breathe normal. This is an advanced exercise.

Up next, we have another metabolic circuit of 5 exercises starting with pull-ups. I want you to go 2 reps short of failure, so if you can do 10, you will only do 8.

Take an overhand grip, slightly wider than shoulder width apart, pull your chest up to the bar and keep it controlled on the way down.

Next, move into dips, doing 2 reps short of failure. I want you to keep your knees up and your body forward to keep the stress off of your shoulder joints. Slowly lower down and drive back up.

Next up are dumbbell rows with 12 reps per side. Start with your knee bent and a flat back with a slight bend in your elbow. Row up and slowly down. Repeat reps on other side.

Cross Body Mountain Climbers are next. This is one of my favorite oblique exercises. Start out in a pushup position and brace your abs. Bring your right knee to your left elbow, keeping your abs braced and alternating sides.

Grab another set of dumbbells for rear deltoid raises. Press your hips back with a flat back. Raise your arms out to the sides and slowly lower down.

Go through this circuit a couple of times and then finish with adrenaline interval training (24 seconds on and 36 seconds off) each week you will do more according to the manual.

This is a really tough workout and will probably take you close to an hour to get through it, but this is hardcore.

http://tinyurl.com/4yxhrrl

Hardcore Warmup

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Abs, Articles, Fitness, Videos | Posted on 16-05-2012-05-2008

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This is TT Hardcore 2010. We’re going to start with our bodyweight warmup and I’m representing North Park High School in Brampton. I spoke to the kids there last week and it was a lot of fun. They were nice enough to give me this T-shirt afterwards.

These workouts are advanced and they will take you about an hour to get through them.

For our warmup, start out with a bodyweight squat with your arms straight out and keep your chest up high as you squat and drive back up.

Next, we’ll get a little dynamic flexibility work for your hamstrings with some leg swings. Each repetition you will go a little farther than the last one. Don’t over-do it because you haven’t been really warmed up, but this will give you a good stretch and a better range of motion in your hamstrings.

After you’ve done both legs with the leg swings, move into a lateral lunge. Step out and down and drive up with your leg while you keep your chest out. This will give you a nice stretch through the groin.

Next, move into a prone stick-up to get your upper back and shoulder mobility going. Lay down on your chest and squeeze your shoulder blades down and together as you move your arms out. Tuck them back in and back down.

Close grip pushups are next. Place your hands shoulder width apart, keeping your body in a straight line with your abs braced. Drop down with your elbows tucked in and drive back up through your triceps, chest and shoulders.

These workouts have quite a bit of intense hamstring contractions in them, so were going to warm them up more with a 1-leg Romanian Dead lift (RDL). Stand on one leg and drive your hips back with your other leg behind you. Stretch the hamstring of your planted leg and bring it back up. Repeat on the other side.

Next, well finish with 2 stretches. The first one will be a hip flexor and psoas stretch. Kneel down with one arm up and lean back and to the side a bit. Youll feel this through your rectus femoris, quads and through your waist. This area gets very tight with all the sitting we all do. Hold this for 30 seconds and then repeat the stretch on the other side.

The next one will be a chest stretch. Place your hand against a wall and rotating away. Hold for 30 seconds and repeat on the other side.

Rest 1 minute and repeat this circuit one more time before you move into Workouts A, B and C of TT Hardcore 2K10.

http://tinyurl.com/4yxhrrl

Ultimate No-Equipment Workout

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Abs, Cardio, Fitness | Posted on 14-05-2012-05-2008

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By Craig Ballantyne, CTT
Certified Turbulence Trainer
http://tinyurl.com/5tm8lgd

One of the most common questions I get asked is something like “If you could only do 5 exercises….?” or “if you could only use one piece of equipment….?”

I have to admit, I think these questions are silly, because when would I ever have those limits placed upon me?

Well, I guess there is one answer…a hotel room. Recently, stuck in a hotel with a terrible gym, all I could do was bodyweight circuits in my room.

Fortunately, because of my insane knowledge of bodyweight training, I was able to create an incredible workout.

To learn more, check out these bodyweight circuits
http://tinyurl.com/5tm8lgd

So let me tell you a secret previously known by only a few of the world’s best personal trainers…

Your body is actually the BEST piece of home gym “workout equipment” in the world for helping you GAIN muscle and BURN fat without spending tons of money.

Countless soldiers, secret service men, professional bodyguards, gymnasts, martial artists, dancers, and athletes have long relied on bodyweight training secrets to build a lean, long, sexy look.

And here’s something NO fitness magazine will ever admit. You know those cover models they put on their magazines? The ones with the six pack abs and flat stomachs and no belly fat?

I’ve met dozens of those fitness models, and only a small percentage even workout with weights.

Most of them are simply athletic and just like to “bang out” a few quick bodyweight workouts per week.

Hardly any mainstream fitness model spends hours in the gym, even though that’s what the magazines tell you month after month.

It’s a complex conspiracy to keep you coming back for long commercial gym workouts, even though their superstar cover models don’t even use those programs.

Men and women with the long, lean bodies you want don’t use workout machines or even spend much time in commercial gyms at all…

…they are warriors, athletes, beach-body surfers, climbers, and all types of other people who prefer bodyweight exercise and fun activities over boring machine workouts.

The cover models are the people you see cranking out workouts at the playground or in the park with little more than their own bodyweight for resistance.

Bodyweight exercise is for people who want a life, not a life sentence of 2-hour long commercial gym workouts.

Cover models – like professional surfer Laird Hamilton, for example – would much rather be out on the beach enjoying their life than “strutting their stuff” in the cardio area of an empty gym on a Saturday morning.

And so would I.

That’s why you could crank out a bodyweight workout three times per week rather than spending another 60 to 90 minutes in the gym lifting weights.

With bodyweight workouts, you’ll save time (they are shorter and don’t require you to drive to the gym and back), so you can enjoy more time outside – heck, you can even do most of these workouts in the park.

You’ll be shocked when you compare the Turbulence Training Bodyweight Cardio workouts against traditional cardio machines because your results will show…

Bodyweight Cardio workouts are more effective for total body conditioning and fat burning

Studies even show that traditional long, slow cardio workouts don’t even work while circuit training can help men and women gain muscle and burn fat at the same time – even if they are over 60 years old.

Bodyweight workouts are for men and women who want to build sex appeal while improving their health, fitness, mobility, and vitality.

And bodyweight exercises are for anyone who wants faster results and the ability to workout at home, rather than being forced into a 2-hour round trip to the gym.

If you want to burn belly fat and sculpt your body like a cover model – while just saying NO to long, boring cardio and extreme overuse bodybuilding workouts -you’ll love the Turbulence Training bodyweight workouts.

Check it out : Bodyweight Cardio
http://tinyurl.com/5tm8lgd

We know that interval training works better than steady state training for fat loss. I’m convinced that metabolic circuits like these are the next evolution in interval training.

Take a look:  Bodyweight Cardio
http://tinyurl.com/5tm8lgd

How to Prevent Sports Injuries

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Articles, Fitness, Health | Posted on 10-05-2012-05-2008

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Keith Scott is a Certified Athletic Trainer (ATC) through the National Athletic Trainer’s Association and also a Certified Strength and Conditioning Specialist (CSCS) through the National Strength and Conditioning Association.

Keith received his Master’s Degree in Exercise and Sports Science with a concentration in Sports Medicine from the University of Arizona. During his 13 years in Tucson, he had the pleasure and opportunity to work with hundreds of athletes each year in the youth, high school and college levels.

Keith focused on injury prevention, post surgical/injury rehabilitation, and Strength and Conditioning. He worked extensively with athletes of all levels and many different sports, with over 15 years working directly with athletes in the trenches. Keith currently resides in Southern New Jersey.

CB: Keith, how do you use your background of athletic therapy when designing programs for people and taking them through their workouts? How might they differ from someone like myself with only a minor background in the area of Rehabilitation?

KS:
I have a very strong background in assessment, so I take a lot more time evaluating range of motion in all major joints (some minor joints too), muscle and tendon strength, joint integrity, and basic movement patterns and mechanics.

I will take a whole session just doing an evaluation sometimes. I also take a pretty thorough history on each person, finding out about previous injuries, chronic problems, pain, etc… and not to forget…the person’s experience level in training.

Once I have a good understanding of the person’s situation I design my programs much like I would a rehab program for someone with an injury. After all, I have yet to meet anyone that does not have problems, imbalances or pain somewhere, so it’s really no different.

I create a “problem list” first and form the program around that. For example, if someone comes in with very tight hip flexors, tight dorsiflexors, and horrible scapular control (like a lot of people that we probably see) those go on my problem list. I create a program around those areas first and work on those things right away. I won’t introduce an exercise in those areas until we correct them or at the very least, are on the road to correcting them.

People that can’t control their hips, or ankles for example, have no business squatting any kind of weight until those things are handled, yet we see trainers, and coaches doing just that everyday.

What I have seen with a lot of trainers and coaches is that this “problem list”, if ever really generated in the first place, gets lost in the program and things never really get addressed that should. Ultimately, the athlete gets injured or never improves. Each program should be different because each athlete is different. Of course this takes more time and effort from the trainer/coach.

All of my programs utilize a lot of hands on work – myofascial work (releasing), teaching of self myofascial work, muscle activation, and hands on stretching (PNF patterns…contract/relax, etc…). I am a big proponent of closed chain proprioception too, for upper and lower extremities as well as joint mobilization techniques and exercises.

I also use a lot more recovery methods with my athletes especially after training sessions. Different types of cold and heat therapy as well as different types of treatment massages and stretching.

CB: what are the typical muscle groups, lifts, and physical abilities that you focus on when training young athletes for sports?

KS:
Assuming that we are talking about high school age athletes first, I use the same type of muscle group training that I would an older athlete. This assumes that there are no major problems that need attacking first.

I work a lot of posterior chain with all of my athletes. Every one of my programs has glute work -extension, abduction, stability, as well as adductor work (which I believe is missed in a lot of programs)

My programs will always have upper extremity pulling exercises included for the posterior chain, and rotator cuff work, especially the external rotators, but a good share of subscapularis work as well…that muscle is overshadowed a lot by the other internal rotators and is extremely important.

I like to train the rotator cuff as a stabilizer more than just as internal/external rotators. Its job is to stabilize first. Here is where I will throw in some closed chain proprioception, PNF patterns, etc..

Along with the pulling and rotator cuff work, I will address scapula stability and function a lot. Sometimes this is just teaching the athlete correct movement of that area. Young athletes are in a perfect place to start to develop correct scapular movement patterns, and stability of that shoulder complex.

This is not to say that I don’t put pushing exercises in programs, because I do, but I certainly don’t think benching needs to be the crux of every program.

CB: What do young athletes really need?

KS:
Young athletes need movement training first…running mechanics, jumping mechanics, lifting mechanics, etc…

I focus a lot of moving correctly. Just by learning how to move correctly and with the correct muscles, will reduce injuries with out a doubt…not to mention make a better and stronger athlete. After that, they need to establish both stability work in all joints, and reactive work.

Common lifts – squats (front, back, split), lunges – (sag. Plane first, and no multi-plane until they master that movement), dead lifts, cleans, push press, rows (seated, bar, db), medicine ball work.

Of course this all will be altered slightly depending on the sport, experience level, and problem list/

CB: Okay, describe a typical session for a young athlete.

KS:
Typical session – address problems first if applicable at this point (ex: pain, tight areas, areas that need activating, releasing, etc.)

If time permits, I will do some releasing or the athlete will him or herself (foam rolling, etc.), followed by a really good active warm up. Mobility drills, and large muscle group warm up (lunges, jump rope, push ups, etc..) Active stretches, proprioception work (balance, coordination work)

Teaching and learning come next – younger athletes need to be taught how to do the lifts, or mechanics correctly, so I will spend some time there at the beginning. It’s essential with kids that you repeat things and get the movement patterns ingrained.

Depending on whether it’s a speed day, the athlete may do some speed, footwork, basic agility work first, and some reactive training. This will be followed with resistance training (major lifts first – dl’s, squats, cleans, presses, etc..) And then any additional work at the end. I will include a lot of core training within the session usually between sets for more advanced athletes.

Most sessions end with some static stretching (ex: hip flexors, calves, heel cord, hip rotators, shoulders), and then recovery modalities if possible. Depending on which season the athlete is in, some energy system work might follow.

CB: At a young athlete level, how much variation is there in the programs between sports?

KS:
As far as resistance training not too much. Almost all of my athletes will do squats of some sort, dead lifts, presses and pulls. I work large muscle groups with all of the younger athletes, and besides rep and set schemes, it is pretty much the same.

I find that most need work on the same areas and those areas are usually the important one’s for all sports. With that said, I will plug certain things into each program depending on the sport.

For example, a wrestler and basketball player will be trained much different when it comes to intensity, rep/set, especially as the competitive season nears. Off-season schemes look much more similar. Energy system training will be very specific to the sport however, as will reactive training and preventive exercises.

CB: What rehab, recovery, and prehab stuff would apply to young athlete training programs that most other trainers are missing?

KS:
As I already made mention to, most young athletes just need to learn how to move correctly first. This goes for all resistance training. Correct form will help to reduce both acute and chronic injuries.

Second, understanding muscle activation should be a standard in all programs, and especially when working with youth. Young athletes just don’t move very well these days and in so many instances I find muscle groups that are just “shut off”. Many trainers are so stuck on increasing flexibility whenever there is a problem, that they miss everything else.

When something hurts, “stretch more”, when you can’t do something “stretch more”. This is the answer to everything. It drives me insane.

In many cases these athletes don’t need more stretching, they need activation. Both primary and antagonist muscle groups. Activation doesn’t only need to be manual, meaning from the trainer/coach, but it can be taught to the athlete as well through simple exercises and drills.

It may sound like a strange form of “prehab”, but its so important in joint stability, and generating strength/power, and efficiency.

Proprioception!!! I don’t see many trainers/coaches dealing with this at all. I like to describe proprioception as how the brain and muscles/joints/body talk to each other…it controls your balance, coordination, and how much of an athlete you really are. Control is a must in all movements. Good trainers and coaches can work it in the program without anyone ever knowing, but in many cases, it needs to be addressed straight up.

Finally, recovery is huge in my world. I don’t see this even talked about much, but it is so important to overall progress and health. Just an ice bag over a sore joint, or a heating modality in the right place can make a huge difference in the athlete and how they respond to your program.

Pain will stop a training program in its tracks. Control pain, soreness, and stiffness and you will get ahead so much faster and safer.

How come some coaches/trainers never share recovery methods with their athletes or clients? It’s a must for me and makes a bigger difference than people think. If you are not using recovery methods with your athletes and clients, you are missing the boat on good progress. Of course, rest and good nutrition are the key for proper recovery. It all needs to be addressed.

CB: Any other general recommendations for young athletes?

KS:
Start eating well when you are young; it makes it so much easier to establish good life long habits when you do so at a young age. It will also pay off more than you think doing the training and completive seasons.

Even if you don’t have a trainer or a coach, make sure you train and condition before your season starts for at least a month, if you are not already playing another sport. The majority of the injuries I have seen over my 15 plus years are because athletes are not in proper condition when the first practice begins.

Get off of the computer and get your rest. Tired athletes usually become injured athletes. Besides, muscles grow and the body heals when you are sleeping and resting. Most teens ignore going to bed at an early enough time.

Play as many sports as you can while you are in high school. Specialization isn’t needed at a young age and may wind up hurting you. The majority of division I athletes that I have worked with were 2 or 3 sport participants.

Craig Ballantyne is a Certified Strength & Conditioning Specialist and writes for Men’s Fitness, Maximum Fitness, Muscle and Fitness Hers, and Oxygen magazines. His trademarked Turbulence Training fat loss workouts have been featured multiple times in Mens Fitness and Maximum Fitness magazines, and have helped thousands of men and women around the world lose fat, gain muscle, and get lean in less than 45 minutes three times per week. For more information on the Turbulence Training workouts that will help you burn fat without long, slow cardio sessions or fancy equipment, visit http://www.TurbulenceTraining.com

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Abdominal Exercises with TT AAA Abs Workout C

Posted by Nigel Jeal | Posted in Abs, Articles, Fitness | Posted on 08-05-2012-05-2008

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This is Workout C from the TT AAA Abs program. We’ve already gone through 2 intense workouts, but we’re going to finish off with a total body circuit called the X9 Factor.

Start with kettlebell swings. These are 2-hand swings and you need to power up with the hips. Drive them back and power them back up.

Move immediately into extended pushups. Move your arms out in front of you as you lower yourself down and back up.

The next exercise is a stability ball pike. This is a more advanced version of the stability ball jackknife. Place your feet on the ball and your hands on the floor and pull the ball in as you push your hips up until you are in a pike position. Try to get your hips as high up as possible. If you are not very flexible, just do jackknifes in place of them.

Move immediately into stability ball back extensions. Plant your feet against a wall or something stable. Your chest is supported by the ball. Place your hands behind your head and raise yourself up and back down.

Next is a 1-arm kettlebell swing. Make sure you are driving back with your hips and back up. If you are more advanced, you can do snatches in place of the swings. Do all reps on one side and then do all reps on the other side.

Next you will do high rep close grip pushups. Tuck your elbows into your sides with your hands closer together as you move down and back up. Do as many as you can.

Move immediately into stability ball leg curls. Place your feet on the ball and bridge your hips up with your arms out to the side. Curl the ball in while keeping your hips up the entire time. Do 20 reps.

The next exercise is a stability ball rollout. Place the ball in front of you and start in an upright position, roll the ball out. Get a nice long stretch as you roll out and contract your abs when you pull it back in. If you have an ab wheel, you can use that in place of a stability ball. This is going to be harder than using a stability ball.

Finally, you’re going to finish off preferably with a sprint as the last exercise. If you can’t do sprinting, you can sprint in place or finish with burpees.

That’s the AAA Abs Workout C X9 Factor.

Read more… http://tinyurl.com/6av22et